Silence therapy

Mt. Hood, Oregon
I'm enjoying the silence of a quiet house. Nap time! Toddlers are sleeping.

Nana's soaking up the silence as a camel gulps down water at an oasis. Soon it will be time to snack on real and pretend food, color, or hold a plastic potato head while small fingers fashion a face. And best of all it will be time again to listen to the uncensored thoughts and feelings of small children's squeals or cries or giggles or chatter or gibberish or grunts.

Children are delightful. Children are wonderfully exhausting. And, yes, now and then, children present challenges for creative problem solving and quick prayers to God for wisdom, patience and perspective. As ever, God is ready and willing to provide for our needs.

Sometimes I miss the time when my own four children were young. Now I enjoy the moments and sometimes hours when I can play with small grandchildren or chat with an adult child.

Resting now will make playing later and the evening's work more enjoyable.

Sometimes sleep isn't what is needed most, silence is. Silence has a way of soothing ruffled nerves and frayed patience. Silence provides a cushion from the busyness of the day so that regaining perspectives is possible. Silence provides an opportunity to stop the doing and be.

God is ever present, ready to help. In the busyness we may forget this, in silence we can rediscover our purpose and strength in Him.

Years ago, I wrote an article for Living with Children, a Christian parenting magazine, entitled "Oasis of Peace," where I discussed opportunities in a busy day where it was possible to find (or make) places of renewing rest. One example I included was the restfulness of washing dishes at night while Dad took young children into another room to play. No one wanted to help! And that was the best help of all for several silent minutes! Just long enough to catch my breath and then join the noisy social life of love in action.

How about you? In all the busyness of your day, how or where do you finding refreshing moments of silence or renewing rest? 

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